Questions for tool owners/area champions

Hi Everybody,

In light of the unique challenges facing new Hack Space members during this pandemic, it feels like a good time to get a new member orientation together.

In order to do that, there is some information that I need from representatives of each area. I will take my best guess if nobody feels like they can speak up for an area/major tool. I’ve compiled it into a list of 17 questions. These don’t need to be the be-all-end-all answers right away, but I’ve bolded the 10 crucial questions.

Safety:

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?
2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?
3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?
4: Where is information about hazards and best practices kept?

Tool use and maintenance:

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?
6: What are the maintenance requirements for individual users?
7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?
8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?
9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

Training:

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?
12: Which tools require a user to be checked out before use?
13: Which tools require training?
14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

Additional resources:

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?
16: Who are the contact persons for this area?
17: What are some good online resources (blogs, tutorials, youtube channels etc) that can support people’s skills development in your area?

The areas that I want to see:
-wood shop
-welding shop
-machine shop
-CNC machines
-electronics area
-3-D printers
-Silk screen/vinyl cutter
-sewing/crafting
-laser (I know the LCC has this pretty dialed in, I can dig it out of your stuff but I’d love a tl;dr if somebody has the cycles to bang one off quick)
-paint and mess room
-giant video wall/mame cabinet
-DMZ

In addition to integrating this into a new member orientation, I am going to collate this information into a form (not unlike the “events” board in the window) that can be put up in each area and serve as a handy resource for anyone using that area.

Having users properly trained and familiar with the expectations of the area will make everyone’s hack space experience easier and more enjoyable.

Thanks everyone.

4 Likes

Some quick answers for the Laser:

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

Primarily:

  • direct high power laser exposure
  • uncontrolled fire from inattentive use of cutter
  • exposure to hazardous fumes from cutting of inappropriate materials

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

  • Do not operate cutter unless properly trained
  • Do not attempt to bypass interlock switches, power control or other safety mechanisms
  • Don’t initiate any cutting operation if the cutter is open, even if the interlocks should prevent them from having an effect.
  • Ask for help/supervision or a refresher if you don’t recall details from the training
  • Cut only approved materials, and do not cut materials of uncertain origin
  • Pay attention and monitor cutting for flare-ups or ignition and deal with it promptly.

3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?

  • Laser safety goggles are kept on the workstation benches near the cutter

4: Where is information about hazards and best practices kept?

  • on the wiki and in the training material

Tool use and maintenance:

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?

  • clear exhaust grill in cutter bed before and after cut to ensure proper airflow
  • pause and allow time for smoke extraction if cutting area becomes visibly smokey
  • do not use excessive power if not needed
  • be careful when moving the laser head that no heavy objects in the bed could get in the way of the move and damage the optics.

6: What are the maintenance requirements for individual users?

  • clean cutter bed and exhaust grill after cutting
  • remove waste material

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

  • power off, and put a sign on the laser marking it as out of commission
  • contact a member of the LCC or #laser on slack as soon as possible and report what happened.

8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?

  • project materials are user supplied
  • laser tubes, exhaust filters, and laser optics are all consumables which are group bought
  • laser goggles are not intended to be consumable, but have usually been group bought when damaged.

9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?

  • contact the LCC if you notice something you believe to be wearing.
  • the LCC will evaluate. Generally, for expected wear like tube or filter lifetimes, budget from VHS general funds will be requested. We have not historically tracked exact balance between funds raised through training fees and expenditures on consumables, but believe them to be relatively balanced.

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • cleanup and remove used materials
  • be mindful of smell or amount of smoke in the area, and manage the cutter appropriately
  • be courteous about allowing those with small cutting jobs timely access to the cutter in the midst of large cutting jobs.
  • avoid excessive use for production runs or large volume cutting that may put unreasonable wear on the equipment, and provide additional funds to support the replacement if you have.
  • be mindful of exhaust noise, and consider not using during workshops or while a presenter is speaking.
  • if not a keyholder check with keyholders how long they anticipate keeping the space open before beginning a potentially long cut.

Training:

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?
12: Which tools require a user to be checked out before use?
13: Which tools require training?

  • Mandatory training and checkout from the LCC is required to use the laser cutter.
  • because our training includes content specific to our specific equipment and procedures, we do not recognize external training or prior experience as sufficient.
  • Training requirements are enforced by tool lockout system.

14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

  • in normal times, we’ve been able to sustain a ~monthly training session cadence.
  • Training is currently on hold due to social distancing requirements.
  • Post a request in the Laser Cutter Training Request Thread to be pinged by the trainer when one is scheduled

Additional resources:

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?

  • The Laser Cutter Committee (LCC)

16: Who are the contact persons for this area?

  • The LCC prefers to triage requests or questions as a group, rather than contacting individual members. Posts in #laser on slack, or in a talk thread will be replied to.

17: What are some good online resources (blogs, tutorials, youtube channels etc) that can support people’s skills development in your area?

Please see our wiki page, and add or suggest additional resources you have found helpful. The tool is flexible enough that there is a large variety of online resources specific to what you are trying to accomplish.

5 Likes

Amazing! Thank you so much!

Hey guys, here’s what I’ve banged off off the top of my head… I’m going to add to it as I think of more, feel free to make suggestions.

Areas covered in this post:
Welding shop
Sewing (particularly the industrial)
Paint and Mess
Video Wall
DMZ/ large project storage

WELDING SHOP

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

  • arc flash; sunburn-like burns to skin, eyes.
  • off gasses from welding and plasma cutting: from lung irritants all the way up to potentially fatal things like metal fume fever from welding or cutting galv, brass, or high molybdenum steel, to phosgene from using chlorinated brake fluid to clean parts.
  • burns from hot metal or welding current
  • heavy materials falling on feet
  • sharp edges
  • sparks lighting things on fire, whether it be clothing or other materials in the shop
  • flying metal particles getting into eyes
  • assortment of injuries possible from misuse of angle grinders
  • entanglement hazard in sander, grinders, saw, etc.
  • noise hazard from cutting tools

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

  • wear appropriate PPE (eye protection, welding helmet, covered skin, safety toed boots)
  • wear natural fibre or fire-resistant clothing, without frayed edges
  • no dangling clothing or jewellery
  • it is recommended that you take off any rings
  • be mindful of where your sparks are going
  • avoid working alone
  • avoid working in pools of water.
  • use angle grinders only with appropriate handles, guards, and disc sizes
  • No galvanized steel (minor excpetion may be made for tacking things like bolts and hinges, but grind off what you can first, and make sure that you use good ventilation)
  • No plasma cutting or welding of brass or Chromoly steel until we have a really solid ventilation system in place.
  • Stainless steel must be welded with good ventilation in place.
  • no chlorinated brake cleaner
  • hearing protection must be worn when using loud tools
  • no open toed shoes
  • mandatory 30 minute fire-watch after last spark, whether form welder, plasma, O/A, forge, or grinder.
  • if you’re not comfortable with a tool, ask for guidance

3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?

  • welding masks (kept near the welders or brought from home. COVID precaution: sanitize designated shared welding masks before and after use with isopropyl alcohol; consider buying your own, and labeling it as non-shared.)
  • welding jacket or opaque natural fibre clothing (kept near the welders or brought from home)
  • leather gloves (kept near the welders or on the tool storage shelf COVID precaution: buy your own)
  • safety toed shoes (users must bring own from home) not absolutely mandatory but recommended; you don’t need them if you won’t be injured if whatever you’re working is dropped on your foot from a height of four feet.)
  • welding screens (stored beside compressor shack. To be used whenever there is somebody working in another area of the space)
  • beanie or bandana (recommended; user supplies own)
  • respirator (particle filter recommended for plasma cutting and standard MIG welding, metal fume cartridge recommended for more exotic stuff (user supplies own))

4: Where is information about hazards and best practices kept?

  • information section on door to outside (pending as of May 2020)
  • information sheet for procedures attached to or positioned near each tool (pending as of May 2020)

Tool use and maintenance:

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?

  • empty gas from welding system when shutting down
  • back the pressure off the regulator to preserve the membrane when shutting down
  • keep tools clear of spatter

6: What are the maintenance requirements for individual users?

  • regularly clear spatter from the tip of the welder
  • ensure that there is sufficient coolant in the band saw (pending, when we get a proper one)

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

  • If you damage a tool, let the area champion know. Shit happens, we’ve all done it. Odds are it can be fixed, and you’ll get to learn how to do that. You might be asked to chip in for parts if necessary.
  • If you find a damaged tool, let the area champion know. If the person who damaged the tool owns up (hey, maybe you didn’t realize that you damaged it. It happens) they may be asked to help with the repair. If not, the hat may be passed around to fund repair or replacement, and the culprit will live with their secret shame forever.

8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?

  • user supplies own grinding and cutting discs, TIG consumables, TIG fill rod, plasma consumables if doing more than the occasional small cut
  • group-bought consumables are gas, welding-wire, band-saw blades (unless you do something stupid and break it that way; then the polite thing is to replace it yourself) chop saw blades (same deal re: stupid things)

9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?

  • The group will pool some money to replace it, typically as a self-assessed function of how much you use that tool.

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • call out “welding” or “eyeballs” when striking an arc if it’s been more than a minute since your last weld
  • call out “loud noise” before making a loud noise (cutting or percussive tools, or dropping materials)
  • clean up after yourself
  • grind down any tacks from bench
  • no grinders or other loud tools after 10 PM, or before 8 AM
  • label your stock on the steel rack
  • store projects in the large project storage area, labelled with your name and the date
  • let the area champion know if we’re getting low on gas or welding wire, or if you feel comfortable doing so, make the replacement and put the request out to the group for reimbursement

Training:

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?

  • Training or extensive previous experience. There is nothing in here that isn’t dangerous.

12: Which tools require a user to be checked out before use?

  • the welders. If you already know how to weld, ask on #welding on Slack and somebody will arrange to have a quick conversation with you about the particularities of this shop and these machines.

13: Which tools require training?
*the welders, or any tool with which you are not presently comfortable.
14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

  • Ask on the #welding channel on Slack, or email janet.mader@gmail.com (or other trainers… let me know if you want to help out with this)

Additional resources:

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?

  • (@Metal_Janet PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU ALSO WANT TO BE A CHAMPION/POINT PERSON!!!)

16: Who are the contact persons for this area?

  • (@Metal_Janet PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU ALSO WANT TO BE A CHAMPION/POINT PERSON!!!)

17: What are some good online resources (blogs, tutorials, youtube channels etc) that can support people’s skills development in your area?

SEWING/CRAFTING

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

  • The industrial walking foot/walking needle machine has a very powerful motor, its needle can penetrate bone.
  • the industrial machine runs very quietly
  • it retains a great deal of momentum even after being powered down.

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

  • keep your foot planted off of the pedal if your fingers are working with the needle assembly on the industrial machine.
  • if possible, run the machine on scrap to sap its inertia before working on the needle or bobbin assembly

3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?

  • n/a

4: Where is information about hazards and best practices kept?

  • warning sign on industrial walking-foot machine

Tool use and maintenance:

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?

  • be gentle with them, keep a clean and tidy workspace
  • clear jams immediately
  • use appropriate thread tension

6: What are the maintenance requirements for individual users?

  • regularly put sewing machine oil into the oiling points on the large industrial walking foot machine
  • clear lint out of bobbin area of machines

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

  • If you damage a tool, let the area champion know. Shit happens, we’ve all done it. Odds are it can be fixed, and you’ll get to learn how to do that. You might be asked to chip in for parts if necessary.
  • If you find a damaged tool, let the area champion know. If the person who damaged the tool owns up (hey, maybe you didn’t realize that you damaged it. It happens) they may be asked to help with the repair. If not, the hat may be passed around to fund repair or replacement, and the culprit will live with their secret shame forever.

8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?

  • user supplies own notions; if you use a lot of a spool of thread, please buy one to replace it.
  • group-bought consumables are whatever finds its way in here by donation. If you use a lot of something, please replace it.

9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?

  • The group will pool some money to replace it, typically as a self-assessed function of how much you use that tool.

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • clean up after yourself
  • keep the clean layout table table clean (we have a paint and mess room for a reason, folks)
  • use fabric scissors on fabric only; no paper, sequins, wire, etc.
  • use the strong knot method to change the thread on the sergers

Training:

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?

  • Previous sewing experience is required before attempting to use the industrial walking foot/walking needle machine.

12: Which tools require a user to be checked out before use?

  • the big industrial walking foot/needle machine. Threading the sergers.

13: Which tools require training?

  • the big industrial, or any tool with which you are not presently comfortable.

14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

  • Ask on the #sewing channel on Slack, or ping @Metal_Janet or @dbynoe for training on the industrial machine. Youtube tutorials are an acceptable resource (other trainers… let me know if you want to help out with this)

Additional resources:

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?

  • (Industrial machine is owned by Janet Mader and David Bynoe PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU ALSO WANT TO BE A CHAMPION/POINT PERSON!!!)

16: Who are the contact persons for this area?

17: What are some good online resources (blogs, tutorials, youtube channels etc) that can support people’s skills development in your area?

PAINT & MESS ROOM

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

  • fume and dust inhalation
  • skin irritation
  • pressure vessel spontaneous disassembly

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

  • use ventilation and appropriate PPE when working with hazardous or irritating substances
  • check pressure/vacuum equipment for damage before use

3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?

  • gloves are on top of the chemical cabinet
  • user supplies own respirator, also own gloves if using more than one pair in a week

4: Where is information about hazards and best practices kept?

  • MSDS should be kept with the product if available, otherwise it can be looked up online

Tool use and maintenance:

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?

  • If you’re not getting good airflow out of the ventilation, change the filter
  • avoid spraying directly onto the filters
  • be sure to use a container with 10x expansion room when using vacuum degassing pots
  • do not run vacuum pump in open air
  • make sure that vacuum pump has adequate oil
  • check seals on pressure pot before use
  • check pressure pot for signs of metal fatigue before use

6: What are the maintenance requirements for individual users?

  • change filters if necessary
  • add vacuum pump oil if necessary
  • make sure that the room is clean for the next person who uses it; no loose dust, glitter, etc, and no lumps on work surfaces or floors

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

  • If you damage a tool, let the area champion know. Shit happens, we’ve all done it. Odds are it can be fixed, and you’ll get to learn how to do that. You might be asked to chip in for parts if necessary.
  • If you find a damaged tool, let the area champion know. If the person who damaged the tool owns up (hey, maybe you didn’t realize that you damaged it. It happens) they may be asked to help with the repair. If not, the hat may be passed around to fund repair or replacement, and the culprit will live with their secret shame forever.

8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?

  • user supplied consumables:
  • group-bought consumables: vacuum pump oil, filters (if you’re using a lot please buy a package), paper for table (if you’re using a lot, please buy a roll) Anything that is in the chemicals cabinet without a label on it is fair game.

9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?
The group will pool some money to replace it, typically as a self-assessed function of how much you use that tool.

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • clean up after yourself

Training:

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?

  • none

12: Which tools require a user to be checked out before use?

  • none

13: Which tools require training?

  • The pressure pot. Any tool with which you are not presently comfortable; youtube videos may be acceptable

14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

  • Ask on the #random channel on Slack, or barring that see if you can find a youtube tutorial (potential trainers… let me know if you want to help out with this)

Additional resources:

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?
(@Metal_Janet PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU ALSO WANT TO BE A CHAMPION/POINT PERSON!!!)

16: Who are the contact persons for this area?
(@Metal_Janet PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU ALSO WANT TO BE A CHAMPION/POINT PERSON!!!)

17: What are some good online resources (blogs, tutorials, youtube channels etc) that can support people’s skills development in your area?
TBD

DMZ/LARGE PROJECT STORAGE

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • clean up after yourself
  • If leaving the space for less than an hour, put a note on your project with your contact info
  • if leaving the space for more than an hour move your stuff into the Large Project Storage area
  • the entire DMZ should be free of mess, projects, and tools at the end of every work session
  • no grinders or other loud tools after 10 PM, or before 8 AM
  • label anything that you put into large project storage with your name and today’s date (refreshes whenever you work on the project)
  • anything left in the space longer than 6 months is subject to being pillaged for parts.
  • anything left unlabeled for more than a week is subject to being pillaged for parts

GIANT VIDEO WALL/MAME CABINET

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

  • tip hazard when screen is being moved around

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

  • ensure that all casters are unlocked before attempting to move
  • push from as low as possible
  • direction of travel should be in line with the screen
  • watch for overhead hazards when moving

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

  • If you damage something, let the area champion know. Shit happens, we’ve all done it. Odds are it can be fixed, and you’ll get to learn how to do that. You might be asked to chip in for parts if necessary.
  • If you find something damaged, let the area champion know. If the person who damaged the thing owns up (hey, maybe you didn’t realize that you damaged it. It happens) they may be asked to help with the repair. If not, the hat may be passed around to fund repair or replacement, and the culprit will live with their secret shame forever.

Etiquette:

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

  • clean up after yourself
  • wash hands before and after use, (COVID 19 avoid touching face while using, sanitize touch surfaces with isopropyl alcohol before and after use)
  • no food residue on hands while using controllers
2 Likes

So that leaves:

Remember that they don’t need to be 100% complete at this time.

1 Like

Thanks for putting all this info together Janet!

One thing - items 1 and 2 under “Paint and Mess Room” appear to be copies of the info about the industrial sewing machine.

1 Like

Not sure who is the electronics area champion right now. I don’t think there is one. A few of us can group write it. Here’s a link to a doc I set up. Fire away everyone/anyone.

Edit: I’ll also just tag some electricity nerds who may know things. :smiley: @mike @Jarrett @JohnC @xquared @bruce @jon @Majicj @Andrew_Hendriks

Edit: okay I barfed some stuff out but more input is needed.

3 Likes

Starting the docs for the Machine Shop and CNC areas:


4 Likes

3D Printers:

1: What are the major hazards and safety concerns in your area/tool?

The hot-end temperature is anywhere from 190c to 220c when using the 3d printers. The printers with a heated bed have temperatures of 50c to 80c when used. There is potential of a person burning themselves on the hot-end if not careful. Even though the printer firmware is programmed to stop thermal or heat runaway, there is also a very slim but real chance of it happening which could result in fire.

2: What are the safety best practices relevant to your area?

Do not leave the 3D printers unattended while printing. This means you do not have to watch the print the whole time it is happening, however you must regularly check on the status of the printer, the bed and hot-end temperatures and the filament flow.

You cannot leave the space while you have a print job running

Check that the printer is powered off before leaving the space.

3: What is the relevant PPE and where is it stored?

Wear safety glasses

5: What are the best practice recommendations to ensure the good function and longevity of these tools?

Only use PLA with the Tinkerine. Do not leave filament in the printer after you have finished your printing.

7: What is the procedure if one damages a tool or finds a tool that is damaged?

Post on talk and or slack 3D printer channel. No one is going to get upset with you if something breaks or is damaged.

8: What is considered a user supplied consumable, what is a group-bought consumable?

There is some donated filament for members to use, but your membership fee does not include filament and members are encouraged to supply their own filament if they financially can. The blue tape is supplied by members and the “champions” of the 3D printers try to ensure it is available. The blue tape is only to be used for the 3D printers – it is too expensive to be used for other things.

9: What happens when a tool wears out through normal wear and tear?

With the Tinkerine, in the past members have taken it back to Tinkerine who have fixed any issues with the printer and given it a tune up. With the i3 clones the “champions” of the 3D printers have replaced or fixed whatever is needed.

10: What are the courtesy expectations of your area?

Do not leave filament in the printer after you are finished. Clean up the area after use. Make sure the printer is powered off after you finish and before you leave the space.

11: What are the prerequisites for using a tool?

Member use only. Training if you have never used a 3D printer.

14: How can a member go about arranging training? (include specific contact info)

Post on talk or slack asking for training. Training can be done by any member who feels they have the knowledge needed to train another person.

15: Who are the champions of the area/ owners of the tools?

3D printers are owned by VHS either donated or built by members for VHS.

“Champions” - @SteveRoy (and others)

16: Who are the contact persons for this area?

There is no formal committee for the 3D printers – rather an ad-hock group of members who look after the printers.

5 Likes