Tablesaw sled


#1

Does anyone know whether or not there is a tablesaw sled for the tablesaw in the woodshop?


#2

We did although I have not personally used it lately. Have posted to slack in woodworking.


#3

@Stevemopolis there is.


#4

Excellent, thank you.


#5

The sled came with the table saw needs to be repaired. I don’t know if that was even done.


#6

A few weeks back, it was cracked and later it was glued, however it was very tight and needed a little effect to slide. I broke the glue, cleaned out most of it, then did my best to align the break with a dowel and glue. After, it slid more easily, but not quite as smoothly as before it was cracked.


#7

I was able to improve it somewhat when I re-glued it with a dowel pin. I adjusted the splay in and out to get to what appeared to be the optimum separation before drilling a dowel hole and re-gluing with dowel. Although a significant improvement, it did not quite slide as smoothly as before the break.
If it is possible to determine whether the rails are a little too tight together, or a little two far apart at the leading edge (closest to the operator), it should be possible to resolve the issue by delicately sanding either the inside edges or the outside edges of the guide rails (as appropriate), particularly at the nearside edge of the sled. My sense is that it should only be a light sanding and, also, to maintain a 90 degree alignment, sanding should be similar on both sides (either inside edges or outside edges … not both!)


#8

Sounds like it’s probably more effort to fix it than to make a new one.


#9

I’m looking at sled plans - looks like there a lot of designs out there. Is there a preferred style you’d recommend @Stevemopolis or is something simple good and am I sawshedding? :smiley:


#10

I used the sled just now. It works pretty well. It binds if you push it unevenly from just one side, but if you push from both sides to keep it straight, it works fine.


#11

Awesome thanks!


#12

I used it the other week as well. it’s a bit sticky but it worked ok.


#13

It’s easy to get carried away with a do-everything sled but I like to keep them simple. It’s more important that the fence is square to the blade and that it slides easily in the channels without any lateral play. Everything else is just bling, although sometimes the bling can useful.


#14

Sorry I didn’t see this earlier. There is a wedgie sled I made, which is pretty minimal, but supports two settable fences. They are particularly useful in making wedges that form a circle (do a search on youtube for wedgie sled and you’ll find plenty of examples). You could square one of the fences in a pinch.