Yo dawg, I heard you like lathes


#1

On the little wood lathe we have lost the inner insert to the live center.

OH NO!

But luckily, we have just the tool for fixing that! A lathe!

I mounted a rod of scrap steel to the lathe and turned it down a bit.

Once I got close to diameter, I turned a point then took it off the lathe to double-check the fit.

I parted it off, here it is ready for assembly.

Luckily we have a box of set screws. I found a matching setscrew and installed it!

Tada! Fixed!

I should probably do it again, because I can get the fit a bit closer. I should learn how to use one of those inside hole sensing devices to get the exact size, because I don’t think I got a good measurement from my calipers. There’s a slight bit of wobble, but it is better than we were (without one). I’ll probably remake this at some point, but now we have something that works.

Yay lathes!


#2

Okay - that is amazing. Being able to machine your own replacement parts is pretty sweet.


#3

Cool @mike!


#4

Using our tools to fix our tools? Favorite~!


#5

@Stevemopolis took a quick look at the work last night; it looks like my measurement issue could actually be based on the geometry of the hole; we think it might be a taper!


#6

Round 2 - This time with more accuracy!

So this time I did a much better job of creeping up on the dimension. I also figured out how to unmount the quill on the tailstock so I was able to do test-fits on the metal lathe. There’s no perceptible movement and it is a bit of a tight fit. From what I can tell, the clearance is about 0.05mm, but that’s far below my measurement error I imagine.

I also made it with some chrome round bar I found in the back bins. That stuff was super tough and I had to take lots and lots of very light cuts. I imagine that’s probably a job for carbide tooling, but I got the job done.

I’m happy to have that little lathe back in full action. If you use it, please let me know how it works out.

-Mike